71st MFNZ Nats – Waharoa 3rd to 7th Jan 2019

The 71st Nats have been and gone, and what a week of flying we had in hot and dry conditions. The weather was simply amazing compared to usual nats rubbish we have had in the past.

This year we changed things up, and ran Aerobatics on RC1 as a combined event. Pattern, Classic and IMAC all mixed in together. The reason for this, we get more people showing up in a single group, which makes running the event easier, and if we hit bad weather, it affects everyone the same. At the previous Nats in Clareville, the day we were supposed to fly IMAC was totally blown out, and we only managed a few hours on the final afternoon. From a committee / CD point of view this approach worked well, and we tried our best to make sure that everyone got a fly of something, in each half day session.

Nats opening BBQ

Day 1 we were on site for a 7:30am briefing, and wheels up soon after 8am with F3A in perfect conditions. We had a ton of flying to get through, and we needed to start on time. The evening before, as the final runway mow was happening, box lines were painted on the runway, and two sets of marker poles were put in place. One problem we face at Waharoa, is early morning sun in the box at the east end near the Kaimai’s, but with 2 sets of new fangled blue perspex “sun spot disc on a pole” setups ready to be used, it was not too much of a problem. The first time you fly with the sun spot in place, it can be a bit daunting, but once it’s in the right place, it’s literally like putting a pair of sunglasses on the sun, and you just get on with it.

We had 6 guys flying F3A and enough judging power to run two flightlines. A special guest from Japan “Akiba”, who has flown F3A at a world level for a long time, was in NZ on a summer holiday with Andrew and Suetonia Palmer. They had taken him on a number of sight seeing things around the North Island, including a few days of practise down at the “picturesque” Galatea airfeild. As well as Akiba, we were also joined by a couple of Ozzies. Scott Kay from Tasmania flew F3A, and IMAC, and Peter Bailey from Melbourne flew Masters A18 pattern. They both brought models, and also managed some sight seeing around the area after the nats with their wives leading the way, first stop all the best boutique shops in Tirau, second stop the Luge !!

We had 7 starters in Clubman Aerobatics, most of them newbies, so after F3A was done, we stopped the flying to do a Clubman Aerobatics demo flight, along with some helpful coaching tips. Then they were into it, with 2 flightlines in action, it was fly, land, now fuel up and do it again down there mate !! Lots of action on the line as the Clubman flights progressed, “Billy Ray” Steven Collins had a moment of disorientation and unfortunately managed to “plough his model slightly” into the nearby Asparagus crop. Lucky he had a spare model, and was soon bolting the wings on it for his next flight. Young Tawhai Webby from Whangarei was having a go at his first Clubman contest, with an electric  “foamey” SBach model. This young fella was on the run all week between freeflight and control line events, then back to RC1, with his dad at the wheel. No surprise that he won the Nats Junior Champion trophy at the end of the week, and nearly took out Aggy too. Another newbie to Aerobatics from the Highbrook club, Arjen Visser thought he “have a go” too, flying a 50cc Extra, and was clearly the man to beat after the first two rounds. Gavin Madsen and Steve Sherbourne or “Gavin and Stacey” as they are now known, had been out practicing Sportsman IMAC in lead up to the nats. I said, hey you guys better enter Clubman too, or you’ll be watching / judging it, and they soon realised that flying it was the better option !! So they did, finishing up 2nd and 4th. Suetonia Palmer has been out practicing again, and with her backup model the mighty Skyraider, she managed to win a round off all the boys, and finished up in 3rd. Pylon flier Les King didn’t have much luck at all, the battery in his electric model ejected through the canopy mid flight, and with no rx power, the ground eventually came up and smite thee.

Pits lineup

By the end of the first morning session, everyone had flown something, and we stopped to clear the field for RC Scale. They had a whopping 30 entries, and needed to get started. 2 flightlines was the order, and they managed to crank through a lot of flying that afternoon.

Day 2, RC Scale finished off, Aerobatics was scheduled to start at 1pm. Here is where we messed up a little. RC Scale actually finished a lot earlier than expected, and the field sat unused for at least an hour. Next time we will be adjusting the program a little, so that if one group finishes early, the next group are there early enough and ready to take advantage of the precious daylight hours. So we got started with more Aerobatics flying, and by now the sun is heating up. On the previous day we had also done a demo for the Basic and Sportsman fliers, and with this out the way, and all the newbies now getting used to the environment, the 2 flightlines allowed the flying flowed through very fast. We definitely get more flying done in two half day sessions, than we do in a single day.

Basic IMAC had 4 entries. This is our entry level class for IMAC (Scale Aerobatics). It can be flown with any model, it does not have to be scale. So if you have a sport model that you flew in Clubman Aerobatics, its perfect for giving Basic IMAC a go too, and vice versa. Arjen Visser who had never even seen the Basic schedule before, had his arm twisted by me the night before, when I showed him a video clip of the schedule. He had only entered clubman and decided to give it a go. His model was a 50cc Scale Aerobatics model, you can’t get better than that for Basic I said. Well he managed to win it !! (Corona ahem). “Billy Ray” Stephen Collins, sporting a new hairdo, was very close behind in 2nd place flying an Edge (30cc I think ?). Not far behind flying her brand new
35cc Hangar 9 Inversa that she got for Christmas !!!! was Suetonia Palmer in 3rd. I can’t wait to see what she gets for her birthday, maybe a 50cc ? (Nah … just get the hundy, forget what Andrew has to say about that). Tony Christiansen was fourth flying his SBach, and provided some real “PBG” entertainment when his throttle servo failed, and Baldrick had to call him in for a “we’ve got a f’n emergency !!! Didn’t ya bloody hear me Bogan !!!” landing.

Day 3 we had another morning slot, but some low cloud and mist meant a short delay till it burned off, which it soon did. I can’t even remember what we flew that session, but once again over two flightlines we cranked through lots of it.

Scott Kay from Tazzie flew Bogans 50cc Extra in Intermediate

Expert Pattern is a new class we introduced this year, and we had 3 fliers flying in this. This class is our stepping stone up from Clubman. Here you learn to fly a simple turn around pattern in the confines of the aerobatic box. F3A 2m x 2m and 5Kg rules apply, so this eliminates a 50cc IMAC machine. An old school pattern model will get around the sequence no problems. Nowdays there are some good cheap electric setups that will do the job. After 6 rounds this class was won by Jayden Molloy, Adam Butler who won a couple of rounds off Jayden was 2nd, and not that far behind in  3rd was Baldrick flying his Vanquish. We look forward to seeing a few more guys, who are not quite up to the task of the Masters A18 schedule, to have a go at this new Expert class in the future.

The Two Pauls – Masters A18

Masters flew 6 rounds of the A18 schedule. This was a close battle, with Paul Tomlinson, Paul Stairmand, and Peter Bailey from Melbourne, all winning rounds as the week on. Eventually it was Peter who finished first in this class. Peter’s model was powered by a YS 4 stroke, the two Pauls on electric. “SMR” (some modelling required) occurred at one stage, when Paul Tomlinson couldn’t get the hatch off his model, to load in the batteries. One of those dodgey hatch latch thingies had jammed up. After a few people poked and prodded at it with various tools, the generator was fired up and I took to it with a Dremel cut off blade, with sparks and fibre glass flying as Paul looked away in horror !!! Chris Wong, our resident dentist heard the unmistakeable high pitched dremel REOW noise and ran over to have a go too. He loves that sound, he told me its sounds just like a brand new ARF model being unwrapped.

F3A was flown over 4 rounds. We had planned to do some of the finals “F” schedule on the final session, but it was a bit windy, and IMAC catch up rounds were needed at this late stage. Akiba from Japan was the winner of F3A, although I did manage to take a round off him, and got very close in 2nd. Andrew Palmer was 3rd followed by Jarrod Briggs who admitted that flying a YS powered model with loads of power available, is actually not too bad after all.

Clubman Aerobatics Fliers – Suetonia Palmer, Arjen Visser, Tawhai Webby, Gavin Madsen, Steve Sherbourne

Classic Pattern – While Clubman Aerobatics was being flown, we had a few guys “attempt” to fly some Classic Pattern, so we squeezed them into the same group. Unfortunately Classic was a bit of a non event, Andrew Palmers motor blew up on the first round, and Lew Woods had four attempts at getting past the take off. In the end Ron Stone and Jayden Molloy where the only ones left, but flying non classic models. This class is taking a while to get going, but I think soon we will see it grow as more people get those classic models up and running, and figure out how to keep them going !! The classic schedule is a centre manoeuvres only sequence, from a mid 1970’s World Champs. Its a slight step up from Clubman. We have bonus points for noise and speed, and cool stuff like retracts. Loads of people have models from this era gathering dust, so try and track one down, and give it a go.  

By Day 4 of the Nats, we were into our final afternoon slot, and it was getting a bit breezy. Not so much that it stopped us from flying, and by now most of the Pattern classes were done, and we just needed to finish off some IMAC. Unknowns were handed out, stick planes started to be waved in the air, as notes were made and sequences learned / studied. Sometimes an event can be won or lost on the unknown round, so the guys were getting focused. 

Sportsman IMAC was a clean sweep by young Jayden Molloy flying his Ultimate Bipe. In the leadup to the nats, we only had 2 entries in Sportsman, “Gavin and Stacey”, as a number of regular sportsman fliers weren’t able to make it for various reasons. Jayden stepped down from Intermediate, to make the class official, and got his name on that big wooden sheild. Gavin Madsen flying his 60cc powered Extra 260 was 2nd, followed by his team mate Steve in 3rd with his 55cc Hangar 9 Inversa. Hopefully we get a few more of the Sportsman guys back at the next meeting, Jayden will be giving the Intermediate guys a dusting up next.

Akiba from Japan joined us for some F3A

Intermediate IMAC was won by Adam Butler, with young James Farrow from Wellington hot on his heels. The pair of them traded rounds all week, but Adam flying a big PBG Extra 260, showed his experience when he took out the final unknown round, sealing 1st place. James flying a 100cc Yak 54 finished 2nd, but he was only just ahead of in Baldrick in 3rd, who put in a hot unknown score, beating James in that round, and getting within 60 points out of 6000. Just goes to show that old age and treachery can still over come youth and enthusiasm every now and again !! Scott Kay battled with himself for 4th place with a borrowed model that probably lacked power in the wind, but he enjoyed his first IMAC contest, and said he couldn’t wait to get home to Tazzie, dust off his big scale machine, and get into some IMAC !!

We had 3 guys flying Advanced IMAC, Chris Wong from the Hawkes Bay with a 120cc Slick 540, Rod Ford from Wellington with a scratch built 200cc Slick 360, and ol’ John Rodgers “Ted” let loose for the week, and back on form with 222cc powered Yak 55. Our Advanced boys were kept busy all week, flying and doing a lot of judging. Ted taking out 1st place honors here, followed by Rodney and Chris. During the week, Baldrick, myself and Rod managed to make more than just a few bottles of “cheeky red” evaporate in Baldricks bus each night while camped on the flightline (it was bloody cold at night !!) and many a constructive conversation took place. Rod left the nats fired up and excited to get his own designed F3A machine in the air and flying.

Unlimited IMAC had 3 fliers, Andrew Palmer, and Jarrod and myself recently back from the Tucson Shootout. A month before the Nats we had a wing failure at Awatoto, damaging our trusty PBG Extra 300. We had made a new identical model during the winter in the lead up to the Shootout, and it went to the US as a spare. So that was finished off, dialled in, and flown at the Nats by Jarrod and I. The young bugger finally managed to take a couple of rounds off me, when I had a senior moment on one of my flights and zero’d something … yes it happens. That was soon remedied when it came time to fly the unknown.

Intermediate IMAC guys – James Farrow (Jnr Pom), Adam Butler (Lurch), Scott Kay & Mike Briggs (Baldrick)

So that was the 71st Nats done and dusted. Aerobatics prizegiving was held on RC1 at the completion of our day 4 afternoon slot, trophies dished out, photos taken, and many people headed for home. Scorching hot weather and a ton of flying. The stack of score sheets that had been run through the laptop during the week was impressive. At least 4 inches thick. Just look at the number of rounds we flew, and you can see why. Great to see so many people there, especially the newbies, who had a ton of fun. It was a busy week, and it took all of us to run it, so thanks to everyone who did their bit by helping setup the field, sitting in a judging, cranking scores into the computer, helping with the pack down etc.

I nearly forgot … Dave Neilson, President of the local model club … what a guy, I rang him in the few days beforehand, as he was on his way to a new years lear up. Hey mate this Nats is looking pretty big, do you reckon you can cook up a few burgers and snags for us. No worries he said. What a legend, he was there every day, with helpers, making it all happen while we flew and flew and flew. We munched through 160 burgers, and a ton of sausages. Those that pitched in to run the BBQ on RC1, a big thanks to you. Gee that IMAC looks like a lot of fun Dave said as we packed up, think I better have a go next time. Good stuff. Get a 50cc Extra I said !! 

Dave and Stan the BBQ Crew !!

The RC1 program of Aerobatics, Scale and Pylon was packed into 4 days, and we got through it all. Day 5 on RC1 was like a ghost town in comparison. Actually they had a Heli fun fly, but I took the chance to fly some leisurely DLG glider with the soaring crew. What a change of pace lol !! I was well and truly sozzled, having flown both Scale and Pylon during the week too. At 5pm the major prizegiving was all over in 20 mins, followed by a final BBQ, but the attendance was low, with most having gone home already. What can we do next time to make a good thing even better ? Perhaps we will look at packing out RC1, with Aerobatics, Scale and Pylon spread over the full 5 day duration. This might mean more are around for that final major prizegiving and wrap up BBQ on that last day. Its tricky, after 4 days people are usually “all nats out” and they just want to go home. The half day sessions worked well, and we need to stick with those. Combining the Aerobatics Pattern, Classic and IMAC together, flown over two lines, was a success. There were only a handful that only flew in one of the disciplines, and I’m sure they left the nats thinking about getting another model going to maximise their flying during the week.

Big Thanks to the Nats Management crew. Len Drabble MNFZ Pres was there 5 days before the nats even started getting stuff together. Steve Warner the Nats manager did great job, this is a huge undertaking, a ton of work goes on behind the scenes to make it all happen. 

Last of all … we have a ton of fliers out there that can do a loop and roll but have the impression that going to the Nationals is for the serious guys only. If only you could see the guys who flew in Clubman Aerobatics and Basic IMAC for their first time. They had a blast, learned a lot, got some trophies, and left fizzed up for more. I actually think the word “Nationals” scares to many people away. Maybe we should rename it to something along the lines of the “MFNZ Summer Jamboree” as a way to try and get more to come and have a go. Hey are you coming to the MFNZ Jambo in January 2020 ? Um, nope … the what ? Yeah the Jambo mate, you should come and have a go with your sport model, we fly all week, we have a great time, camping, BBQ’s every night, few beers, tall stories, more flying, sun burn can be a bugger though ….  mate you’ve gotta sign up for the Jambo !! 

See you next time, Bogan.

More photos and final results follow below. Click the photos for a full size view.


71st MFNZ National Championships – Pattern

Contest Results

As of 7-Jan-2019 13:26


Classic Pattern

Final scores in Classic Pattern ranged from a low of 48.0 to a high of 4,000.0 (a range of 3,952.0)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known Points [pt]
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 5
Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1
1 Jayden Molloy (Classic) 4,000.0 1,000.0
thrown
missing figure score(s)
1,000.0
missing figure score(s)
1,000.0 1,000.0
missing figure score(s)
1,000.0 15
2 Ron Stone (Classic) 3,554.3 937.6
missing figure score(s)
980.2
missing figure score(s)
816.6 819.9 538.3
thrown
8
3 Lew Woods (Classic) 48.0 48.0
missing figure score(s)
0.0
thrown
missing flight score(s)
0.0
missing flight score(s)
0.0
missing flight score(s)
0.0
missing flight score(s)
3

[pt] – “Points” (aka, regional points) are explained below.


Clubman Pattern

Final scores in Clubman Pattern ranged from a low of 1,255.8 to a high of 3,985.0 (a range of 2,729.2)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known Points [pt]
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 5 Round 6
Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1
1 Arjen Visser 3,985.0 1,000.0 926.5
thrown
1,000.0 984.1
thrown
985.0 1,000.0 35
2 Gavin Madsen 3,934.5 957.1 1,000.0 0.0
thrown
missing flight score(s)
0.0
thrown
missing flight score(s)
1,000.0 977.4 24
3 Suetonia Palmer 3,762.5 954.9 761.4
thrown
741.8
thrown
1,000.0 877.1 930.6 15
4 Steve Sherborne 3,451.1 835.2
thrown
886.7 843.6 825.4
thrown
878.7 842.0 8
5 Steven Collins 3,441.5 537.2
thrown
909.6 680.0
thrown
850.1 818.9 862.8 3
6 Tawhai Webby 3,255.0 744.9
thrown
777.1 741.8
thrown
823.6 775.7 878.5 2
7 Les King 1,255.8 415.3 674.7 0.0
thrown
165.8 0.0
thrown
missing flight score(s)
0.0
missing flight score(s)
1

[pt] – “Points” (aka, regional points) are explained below.


Expert Pattern

Final scores in Expert Pattern ranged from a low of 3,533.2 to a high of 4,000.0 (a range of 466.8)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known Points [pt]
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 5 Round 6
Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1
1 Jayden Molloy 4,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 977.0
thrown
984.2
thrown
15
2 Adam Butler 3,861.2 846.2
thrown
904.2 957.0 795.2
thrown
1,000.0 1,000.0 8
3 Mike Briggs 3,533.2 829.5 793.1
thrown
885.2 910.5 907.9 824.1
thrown
3

[pt] – “Points” (aka, regional points) are explained below.


Masters Pattern (A18)

Final scores in Masters Pattern (A18) ranged from a low of 3,870.8 to a high of 3,983.1 (a range of 112.4)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known Points [pt]
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 5 Round 6
Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1
1 Peter Bailey 3,983.1 1,000.0 872.8
thrown
973.4
thrown
1,000.0 983.1 1,000.0 15
2 Paul Tomlinson 3,960.9 963.5 1,000.0 997.5 874.3
thrown
1,000.0 877.2
thrown
8
3 Paul Stairmand 3,870.8 927.8 849.1
thrown
1,000.0 873.2
thrown
997.6 945.4 3

[pt] – “Points” (aka, regional points) are explained below.


F3A Pattern (P19)

Final scores in F3A Pattern (P19) ranged from a low of 1,845.1 to a high of 3,000.0 (a range of 1,154.9)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known Points [pt]
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4
Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 1
1 Akiba 3,000.0 931.9
thrown
1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 30
2 Frazer Briggs 2,935.8 1,000.0 900.8
thrown
997.8 938.0 20
3 Andrew Palmer 2,797.3 942.6 887.9 966.7 879.4
thrown
12
4 Jarrod Briggs 2,588.6 851.2 772.1
thrown
874.5 863.0 6
5 Scott Kay 2,458.9 753.4
thrown
818.4 813.5 827.0 2
6 Chris Wong 1,845.1 639.0 615.7 590.4 528.9
thrown
1

71st MFNZ Nationals IMAC

Contest Results

As of 7-Jan-2019 13:31


Basic

Final scores in Basic ranged from a low of 3,292.5 to a high of 4,000.0 (a range of 707.5)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3
Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2
1 Arjen Visser (50cc Extra) 4,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 988.0
thrown
960.7
thrown
1,000.0 1,000.0
2 Stephen Collins “Billy Ray” (Edge 540) 3,892.6 924.1
thrown
926.6 1,000.0 1,000.0 922.2
thrown
965.9
3 Suetonia Palmer (Inversa) 3,687.0 894.8 778.8
thrown
942.8 903.8 945.7 892.5
thrown
4 Tony Christiansen (S-Bach) 3,292.5 797.0 668.1
thrown
830.3 300.6
thrown
817.2 848.0

Sportsman

Final scores in Sportsman ranged from a low of 5,132.9 to a high of 7,000.0 (a range of 1,867.1)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known Unknown
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 1
Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2
1 Jayden Molloy 7,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0
thrown
1,000.0
thrown
1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0
2 Gavin Madsen “Gav” 6,285.6 916.8 940.2 934.3 855.1 795.3
thrown
880.8 828.6 732.2
thrown
929.8
3 Steve Sherbourne “Stacey” (Inversa) 5,132.9 702.1 878.2 676.1 687.7 634.7
thrown
672.7 625.5
thrown
753.9 762.2

Intermediate

Final scores in Intermediate ranged from a low of 4,987.2 to a high of 5,990.6 (a range of 1,003.4)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known Unknown
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 1
Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2
1 Adam Butler “Lurch” (PBG Extra 260) 5,990.6 1,000.0 824.1
thrown
1,000.0 875.4
thrown
1,000.0 1,000.0 990.6 1,000.0
2 James Farrow “Jim” (Yak 54) 5,779.3 973.2 1,000.0 965.7
thrown
1,000.0 998.9 850.7
thrown
1,000.0 807.2
3 Mike Briggs “Baldrick” (PBG Extra 260 Big Foot) 5,719.5 979.1 904.7 861.0
thrown
950.5 984.6 898.6
thrown
943.9 956.8
4 Scott Kay (Bogans 50cc Extra 330LX) 4,987.2 725.0
thrown
739.3
thrown
918.8 786.6 791.3 918.0 905.6 666.8

Advanced

Final scores in Advanced ranged from a low of 5,261.4 to a high of 7,000.0 (a range of 1,738.6)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known Unknown
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 5 Round 1
Seq 1 Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2
1 John Rodgers “Ted” (Yak 55) 7,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0
thrown
1,000.0 1,000.0
thrown
1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0
thrown
1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0
2 Rod Ford “Rod” (Slick 360) 6,262.8 880.3 942.3 869.6 840.9 669.8
thrown
740.2
thrown
982.5 833.4 816.6
thrown
913.8
3 Chris Wong (Slick 360) 5,261.4 809.0 597.8
thrown
718.9 768.3 820.1 834.4 653.3
thrown
661.7 583.8
thrown
649.0

Unlimited

Final scores in Unlimited ranged from a low of 3,824.0 to a high of 5,000.0 (a range of 1,176.0)

Rank Pilot Final Score Known Unknown
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 1
Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2 Seq 1 Seq 2
1 Frazer Briggs “Bogan” (PBG Extra 300) 5,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 996.7
thrown
882.0
thrown
1,000.0
2 Jarrod Briggs “Grommet” (PBG Extra 300) 4,573.5 883.9
thrown
826.8
thrown
936.1 918.0 1,000.0 1,000.0 719.4
3 Andrew Palmer (PBG Extra 260) 3,824.0 607.9
thrown
764.9 771.4 760.2
thrown
859.2 850.3 578.1

Aerobatic Champion Results – Works on your average percentage possible. You get bonus points for flying multiple classes. You carry either your average, or your maximum score, which ever is higher. Congrats to Akiba from Japan !!